Tag Archive for Jobs

Commentary on the April 2014 BLS Jobs Report

Ok, 50 straight months of job growth in the private sector – almost unprecedented – and we’re roughly back to where we were in late 2007, just before the official beginning of the “Great Recession.” The top line number for the report on April job creation was 288,000 new jobs and a decline in the unemployment rate to 6.3%. In many economic recoveries in the post-WWII years, this would be good news and worth celebrating. But the Long Depression that began in 2007 is far from over, and I don’t mean just that the number of long term unemployed remains higher than in any other post-recession period or that the labor force participation rate is lower than at any time since the early 1980s, both of which are true. I mean the underlying problem, that the US economy is a failure in achieving the core goal of any modern economy: generating living wage jobs for all willing and able to work.

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Commentary on the March 2014 BLS Jobs Report

A limping economy reflected in feeble jobs numbers and inadequate policy prescriptions. Those are the conclusions to be drawn from the Department of Labor’s March Jobs report and Fed Chair Janet Yellen’s March 31 speech in Chicago.

The March jobs situation illustrates the problems of a static economy which added 192,000 jobs, down from February’s 197,000 jobs. Unemployment was unchanged at 6.7 percent. Unemployment among African Americans rose over the previous month, from 12 to 12.4 percent, while Latino unemployment decreased slightly from 8.1 to 7.9 percent.

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Guest Post: The Economics Of Social Democracy

This guest post is authored by noted US/UK political economist and friend of CPEG John Weeks. Weeks is an economist and Professor Emeritus at SOAS, University of London. This article is a cross-post from the European Social Journal website.

In a recent article in the Social Europe Journal, Shayn McCallum develops in some detail his interpretation of the “political economy” of social democracy. Central to his approach is the work of Karl Polanyi, and specially the famous Chapter 6 of The Great Transformation, “The Self-regulating Market and the Fictitious Commodities: Labor, Land, and Money”. This chapter, obviously influenced by Karl Marx who is not cited, provides the basis for developing the “economics” of social democracy.

I specifically seek to distinguish the economic policy framework of social democracy from that of “liberalism” as that term is used in the United States (for a longer discussion see Chapter 10 of my new book, The Economics of the 1%). US-style Liberalism under different names has characterized the policies of the left of center parties in most of Western Europe.

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Commentary on the December 2013 BLS Jobs Report

The theme of this month’s jobs report ought to be ‘not enough.’ The latest disappointing numbers are far lower than the optimistic expectations voiced by many economists after ADP reported payroll growth of 238,000 in December 2013. CPEG has been arguing for years that what job growth the U.S. economy has seen since the official end of the ‘great recession’ has been inadequate. In fact, the total number of employed workers in the U.S. is still lower than it was before the start of the great recession. The Bureau of Labor Statistics announced this morning that the economy added 74,000 jobs in December 2013, falling far short of expectations. This anemic job growth brings the total employment in the country to less than what it was in November 2007, the month before the great recession started. It’s important to note that if the economy had added the 200,000+ jobs that many expected, we would still not have reached pre-recession employment levels. Even a ‘good’ jobs report would have been disappointing.

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Commentary on the November 2013 BLS Jobs Report

The markets – Dow is up more than 150 points – and the media – “economy set to add most jobs since 2005” – liked today’s jobs report: 203,000 jobs created in November 2013. And, of course, we should be glad over 200,000 people had jobs in November who didn’t have them in October. But does this mean that the economy is up and running for us? Perhaps the best way to answer that question is to take three dates: Nov 2007, the last month before what has been labeled the “great recession,” June 2009, the official end of the “great recession”, and today and look at the job numbers. The table below provides that comparison (all numbers in 000s, population and labor force are people 16 and over, seasonally adjusted).

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